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Fraud Alert

Scammers have entered the Pet / Animal arena, and they can be on either side of the transaction, as buyer or seller. 
 
They are easy to spot if you look closely. Their phony names (Example:Jarry Smith) and terrible misuse of the english language are typically a dead giveaway.  Most of the scammers also originate overseas. Always talk to them on the phone before you make any transactions, and make sure you are 100% comfortable.
 
ALWAYS USE ESCROW.COM OR PAYPAL. ITS A BIG MISTAKE TO USE CASH TO BUY OR SELL. IF YOU WIRE MONEY, YOU ARE MAKING A MISTAKE.

NEVER USE WESTER UNION. THEY DO NOT PROVIDE BUYER PROTECTION.

The most common scams involve:

Overpay Scam - The buyer pays the seller up front with a cashiers check or money order for more than the item is worth. They then ask you to send the difference back. You send the difference, and the check is bogus. You lose, the scammer wins.
 
Free Adoption/Freight Scam - The buyer is giving away the pet for free.  You just have to wire the money for shipping in advance. Don't do it!!
 
Houdini Scam - you pay them in advance, and they disappear. Don't be fooled by them having a website. It's part of the scam.
 
Always ask the other party for a phone number before you finalize a purchase, and arrange for a phone conversation. Don't rely on email as the sole source of communication. If they don't comply, or they give excuses why they can't provide a phone number, that should be a clue that you're walking into trouble.
 
Again, never use Western Union. Use an escrow service such as escrow.com or use a payment service like Paypal. Be VERY suspicious of anyone asking you to send money overseas when the ad location is domestic.  There is a high probability that it's a scam.
 
Most scammers steal pictures for their ads from other listings out on the web.  One of the best ways to determine if the seller is real is to ask them for additional pictures of the pet. Ask them to add specific detail in the picture, such as a piece of paper with your name on it, or any other item that would help to authenticate that the seller is really in possession of the pet and not a fabrication.  If they can't provide additional images, or balk at your request, be safe and retreat from the purchase.

Use a contract with very specific and explicit detail with regards to the breed you are buying, health guarantees, what registration and when registration papers will be available, and what the options are to return the pet if it's sick or not what you and the other party agreed.  Use as much detail as possible when defining the deliverables.
 
Good luck, and use good business judgement, and do not let emotion get in the way.